Archive for August, 2017

Free Social Media Management Tool

Free Social Media Management Tool

The LinkedIn Academy in association with the Prudent Marketing Company would like to offer you a Free Social Media Management Tool. This great tool has been specifically designed for SME’s to manage their day to day Social Media.

Introducing The Prudent Social Media Portal

Schedule Social Media professionally and in advance!

  • Save hours of time on your social networks
  • Increase your engagement, likes and success
  • Easily find and post relevant content & videos
  • Schedule days or weeks of content in minutes
  • Manage your social networks in one place
  • and more!

Use of our portal includes:

  • Bulk upload post scheduler – Schedule 100’s of posts to go out over a time period at a push of a button!
  • Reporting – Discover your stats easily and quickly! Find out what is working and what isn’t!
  • Content Streams – Find new content with ease and schedule to go to your network in seconds!
  • Visual Composer – Create great looking images/adverts using the visual composer!
  • All this and it’s super easy to use with a simple design and layout.

Create your FREE account Here!

Our Pro version is only £15 per month, with no tie-in!

Social media and libel

Social media and libel

Great advice from BBC News…

Using social media – such as social networking sites Facebook and Twitter – can be a great way to interact and communicate with others. But it’s worth remembering that we’re potentially sharing our thoughts and views with the whole world.

Even if you’ve secured your account so that only a select few can view it, there’s always a risk that something you share could be reposted elsewhere.

And if what you share on social media sites is ‘defamatory’ (meaning that it could be damaging to someone’s reputation), then you could land yourself in hot water, legally speaking…

Think before you post

Consider the following scenario and think about the possible consequences.

You’re watching a TV show and a famous guest is being really obnoxious. You grab your phone and tweet some very cutting remarks about that person.

In the eyes of the law, you’re allowed to express honestly-held opinions. However, if your comments go beyond cutting remarks and become serious allegations, then you could face legal repercussions – especially if what you are saying is based on unfounded claims.

The legal viewpoint

An online comment, such as a tweet, is potentially libellous in England and Wales if it damages someone’s reputation “in the estimation of right-thinking members of society”. It can do this by exposing them to “hatred, ridicule or contempt”.

It is a civil offence (rather than a criminal one) so you won’t go to prison, but you could end up with a large damages bill. These rules also apply to a ‘retweet’ – which is when you share or forward someone else’s message on Twitter.

You may not have made the original allegation, but retweeting it could be seen as an endorsement. You could be accused of making a defamatory statement, and you could be sued.

You can also be sued even if you do not name a person in a defamatory statement. Basically, if the person you are talking about can be identified from what you have said, then you can be sued.

Scotland has a different legal system to England and Wales, but the same principles broadly apply when it comes to defamation.

Word of warning

In a court of law it would be down to you to prove that what you’ve said is true or to use one of the other defences to defamation, such as truth (ie what you can prove to be true) and honest opinion.

And don’t think that if you delete a defamatory post then you can’t be sued – you can. The length of time it is visible could affect the amount of damages you would have to pay, but just because you’ve deleted it doesn’t mean others haven’t already reposted it. Once it’s out there, you can’t always take it back.

Any material published in the UK – including online content – is subject to defamation, privacy and contempt laws and could even be a racism or terrorism offence.

So if you’re a national newspaper editor, a bedroom blogger or just a quick-fire tweeter, you do need to think before you post. The only way to be completely safe is to avoid posting gossip unless you know for a fact that it is true.

Glossary

Libellous Defamatory comment (‘defamatory’ means damaging to someone’s reputation) in ‘permanent’ form, ie written or broadcast.

Try our Social Media Management Tool for Free! Click Here! 

Social Media Content Statistics

Social Media Content Statistics

1. Tweets with images receive 18% more clicks than tweets without images.

2. 100 million food and 146 fashion boards exist on Pinterest.

3. On LinkedIn, 98% of posts with images receive more comments and posts with links have a 200% higher engagement rate.

4. There are about 81 million fake Facebook accounts and about 5% of twitter accounts are bogus.

5. 100 million hours of video content are watched on Facebook daily.

6. More than 1 million LinkedIn users have published long-form content, with 160,000 long-form posts being published weekly.  and over 19.7 million SlideShare presentations have been uploaded to the platform.

7. 88% of businesses with more than 100 employees use twitter for marketing purposes.

8. The user-submitted YouTube video with the most views is “Charlie bit my finger” with over 845 million views.

9. Pizza is the most widely instagrammed food, directly ahead of steak and sushi.

10. Blogging continues to grow, with over 409 million people viewing more than 23.6 billion pages each month on WordPress alone.

Try our Social Media Management Tool for free! Click Here!

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